Honda BR V Performance & First Drive

Honda BR V Overview

The BR-V is Honda’s new small SUV for India. It’s an all-new model but comes built on the same platform as the Honda Brio, Amaze and Mobilio models. In case you are wondering, BR-V expands to ‘Bold Runabout Vehicle’ and Honda has no pretensions in admitting this is a car meant for an urban clientele. Those looking for something with mud-plugging ability had better look elsewhere. Not to say the BR-V is an exception. Rather, it fits right into a market segment where off-road prowess is rarely ever a consideration for buyers. You are probably already familiar with the Hyundai Creta, Maruti S-cross, Renault Duster and Nissan Terrano that the BR-V will take on, so let’s get straight to it and see where and how the Honda hopes to differentiate itself.

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The first thing of note is its length. With a length of 4,456mm, the BR-V is the longest of the small SUVs and by quite a margin. For perspective, a Hyundai Creta measures 4,270mm from end-to-end. Second, the BR-V is not immediately identifiable as a Brio, Amaze and Mobilio platform mate, at least when viewed from the front, and that’s a good thing. The BR-V’s squared-out bonnet, angular headlamps and chrome-rich two-part grille has given it a bespoke face and it looks all the better for it. However, see it in profile and you could mistake it for a Mobilio; the upward shoulder line and distinctive kinked window line are shared with the MPV. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop.

Honda BR V Style

Does it look like a Mobilio on steroids? Umm, not entirely. The face and the rear look nothing like the Mobilio. However, the side profile, especially that kink in the window line, makes it look awfully similar.The Honda BRV shares its platform with the Amaze compact sedan and the Mobilio MPV. We’re glad it shares just the platform and not the looks. The face looks inspired from the new Accord, incorporating neat elements, such as projector headlamps with LED light guides and a thick double slat chrome grille. We like the finer aspects such as the detailing in the headlamps, the aggressive creases on the bumper and the silver skid plate. All these work well together to give the BR-V a likeable front profile.

The side and the rear are slightly bland in comparison. The 16-inch alloy wheels look great in isolation. However, pair them with the sheer length of the BR-V and it tends to look lost and rather small. We think a set of 17-inch alloys, like the Creta, would’ve filled in the wheel arches beautifully and given the BR-V a more balanced side profile. It gets a healthy dose of creases here as well and does remind one of the Mobilio.The matte-black cladding, flared wheel arches and the roof rails grab a lot of attention. They do their bit to lend the BR-V the rugged appeal that its potential customers want. I for one, love the connected tail-lamps. Look closely and you will find LED light guides in them too.

Honda has played the length card with the BR-V. It is by far the longest vehicle in its class. However, it isn’t as wide. The Honda is 45mm narrower compared to the Creta, and a full 87mm narrower compared to the Duster. While this was a boon in certain narrow bylanes of Udaipur, we wish the car was slightly wider. The added width would have not only liberated more space inside but also contributed to giving it a butch stance. To sum up, the ‘van meets SUV’ design is a mixed bag. It looks great from certain angles, such as the front three-quarters, but ends up looking drab and mini-van like from the rear. Honda has somehow managed to stitch it all together into one neat package.

Honda BR V Space

This is the area where BRV truly scores big. A large cabin with a very good all round visibility makes it a nice place to be in. Our test car was an older version and hence lacked a touch screen with reverse parking sensor making it difficult to slot it in tight parking places while reversing. Even the Bluetooth pairing was a bit cumbersome when compared to similar feature in other modern cars, but thankfully Honda has addressed both these issues in the newer versions.

The highlight of the car is the space available for the fellow passengers, be it the second row seat with features like front & back seat slider and backrest recline adjustments, or the third row seat which can actually accommodate full size adults, unlike the other seven seaters available in the market. For the comfort of the third row passenger, Honda has also provided the seat recline feature here and small storage spaces are provided for improved convenience on long hauls.

The single touch tumble feature for the second row seats, ensure easy access to the last row seats. Also, the split seat folding for both rows provide the user with multiple options for storing tricky luggage in the car. This is particularly useful when you don’t trust a courier guy on safe transit of fragile lightweight stuff, over short distances e.g., delicate and voluminous articles like large canvas paintings, glass artefacts or any other simple household item needing careful handling. Check for Honda BR V  in industrynewswire.in

Honda BR V Gearbox

As expected, the BR-V for India will be available with three powertrain options with power channelled solely to the front wheels. There will not be any all-wheel-drive version. The mainstay of the BR-V range will be the diesel model that comes powered by Honda’s 1.5-litre, i-DTEC engine. While there were indications the engine would be tuned for more power on the BR-V, it continues to make 100hp and 200Nm; same as on the Honda City, Jazz and Mobilio. However, refinement sees an improvement. The engine runs a lot quieter than it does on the other Hondas and the note is also less industrial. That said, the diesel BR-V is still noisier than the Creta and even the Renault Duster.

Performance from the diesel engine is good with plenty of pulling power from very low in the rev band. Where the engine does feel slightly different now, is in its willingness to rev more freely. The engine still doesn’t excite, but there’s more of a powerband to play with. Another nice feature is the smooth-shifting six-speed gearbox that’s allied to a light clutch, both of which help make the BR-V diesel an easy car to drive in town. Diesel BR-V buyers can also expect good fuel economy. The ARAI-tested fuel efficiency figure of 21.9kpl makes this version of the BR-V the most fuel-efficient model among the small SUVs. Before you ask, no, there will not be an automatic version for the diesel.

The other engine of choice will be Honda’s 119hp, 1.5-litre, i-VTEC petrol engine. This engine will be available with both manual and automatic gearbox options. Interestingly, the manual gearbox is a new six-speed unit rather than the five-speed one the petrol City and Mobilio come with. Honda insiders haven’t confirmed if this gearbox will make it to the other Hondas as well, but it’s something to expect in the near future. The petrol manual BR-V’s ARAI-tested fuel efficiency is 15.4kpl while the petrol automatic’s figure is slightly higher at 16kpl. The BR-V automatic that is likely to interest urban buyers uses a continuously variable transmission (CVT). Drivers have the option to manually operate the gearbox via steering-mounted paddles which is a first-in-class feature.

The CVT-equipped BR-V does feel nice and responsive for city use. Initial responses are good and pottering around town is a smooth and relaxed affair. But press down hard on the accelerator and you get that rubber-band effect CVTs are notorious for. The gearbox has the engine hold revs until speeds build and this also brings out the engine’s noisiest side. The otherwise smooth engine sounds gruff when this happens, and seems especially thrashy close to the 6,500rpm. Drive with moderate throttle inputs and you’ll like the CVT a lot more. Enthusiasts will like the option of the paddle shifters that work without any delay and let you shuffle between the gearbox’s seven ‘steps’. However, due to the characteristics of the CVT setup, you don’t get the same sort of connect you would with a traditional automatic or dual-clutch transmission.

Honda BR V Driving

The BR-V’s ride is forgiving and absorbs most of the undulations our roads will ever throw at it. It is stiffly sprung, but not up to the point where the ride becomes jarring. At low speeds, the 210mm of ground clearance and the India-friendly suspension dismiss the potholes and broken roads without a hiccup. The ride is slightly bouncy at the second and third row but is tolerable for shorter journeys.

Handling has been the Japanese carmaker’s forte for long. The steering weight and feel are just about right. It is wonderfully light at low speeds letting you chuck the thing around with a finger. However, the turning radius is gigantic thanks to the length. Taking a U-turn is a task in itself. Other than that, the BR-V is sure-footed and doesn’t mind being thrown around a series of bends. There’s enough feedback that gives you the confidence to push it through the corners as well.

Honda BR V Safety

The braking system of Honda BR-V features disc brakes at the front and drum brakes at the rear. The ABS with EBD is used as a standard in all variants except the petrol E variant.The body shell is made strong with ACE body structure and front dual airbags are introduced in all variants for complete safety of the occupants.Braking duties are taken care of by disc brakes at the front, and drums at the rear. Braking power is adequate and the SUV doesn’t nose dive a lot under heavy braking and manages to maintain its line as well. Safety is taken care of by dual airbags that are standard across the range.

Honda BR V Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Brv On-Road Price in Hyderabad ranges from 10,46,963 to 15,65,132 for variants BRV E Petrol and BRV VX Diesel respectively. Honda Brv is available in 9 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Honda Brv variants price in Hyderabad. Check for BR V price in Hyderabad at Carzprice.

Honda BR V Conclusion

In the last three months Honda BRV travelled with us for a total distance of over 5000 kms. During this period we did not come across any technical glitch barring a minor failure of internal air circulation switch, which got rectified promptly by the local dealership. The BR-V worked with us like a loyal horse without the regular whine and complaints. It returned a very good city mileage and could carry seven occupants with ease offering reasonable comfort even for the third row passenger. Overall we found Honda BR-V to be a sensible and trouble free buy for someone looking for a large family car offering comfort, reliability and a bit of status for the owner. While its not exactly ideal for long distance travel, it fit in well for daily usage and also your weekend getaways.

Honda Jazz Review & First Drive

Honda Jazz Overview

The 2018 Honda Jazz, even according to Honda, isn’t an all-new car. They will even tell you that it is not an official MMC, which stands for Mild Model Change, the type that you would typically have halfway through a cars product cycle. It is then an update to keep the Jazz fresh in a market full of well equipped modern premium hatchbacks. What we are trying to say is that expecting a lot from this update is not very fair. That said, let talk a little about what has changed in terms of the new 2018 Honda Jazz.

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The Honda Jazz has always been one of the better premium hatchbacks on sale, with a great chassis and lots of space. Although with the new 2018 Hyundai i20 proving to be a runaway success and the Maruti Suzuki Baleno still topping the sales, Honda would have begun to feel the pinch. This meant a hurried, mid-mid-cycle refresh to keep the Jazz relevant until the all-new one makes it to India was the order of the day. Now that it’s on sale, we tested it to find out if the updates are good enough to make some difference. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

Honda Jazz Style

We wouldn’t blame you if you thought Honda hasn’t bothered changing anything with respect to the design. That’s because, they haven’t — at all. The “updated” version of the Jazz has had no changes to the sheet metal, or the bumpers. International markets got a fresher looking model in 2017, replete with sportier looking bumpers, new alloy wheels, and a full-LED headlamp cluster (a la Honda City). Sadly, the Indian version gets the short end of the stick.

There’s nothing substantial to report here, save for the small dollop of chrome on the door handles, and the extended lighting in the tail lamps. The added lights, though, are available only in the top-spec VX variant. Since we’re talking of the VX variant, do note that the Jazz no longer gets the sweet-looking spoiler.Honda could have used this update to jazz it up a bit (pun intended), and throw in a pair of daytime running lamps if not the full-LED headlamps. But, that’s not been the case. What we do get, are two new colours borrowed from the Amaze – red and silver.

Honda Jazz Space

The big changes on the Honda Jazz have been focused on the interiors, most of which are centred around the new Digipad 2.0 infotainment system, which now comes in the form of a 7-inch touchscreen that features Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and in-built navigation. The Digipad 2.0 also doubles up as a screen for the reversing camera with grid-lines and three different camera angles, which is a boon for parking in tight spaces. The top-of-the-line Diesel Jazz, as well as the petrol CVT trim, also get the new start-stop button from the Honda City, that has a cool red pulse illumination. Not much use but it definitely adds to the Jazz’s cool quotient.

The 2018 Honda Jazz also gets a few more premium touches including a new centre armrest with storage, a driver’s side vanity mirror and speed sensing door locks. The strange bit is that the Jazz’s signature magic seats in the back have disappeared altogether and have been replaced for a standard bench in the back. The back does not even get a rear-ac vent, which is a big miss, although the Jazz is still the roomiest of the premium hatchback with a generous amount of knee room, leg-room and shoulder space. Even the 354-litre boot is the best in its class and is more than ample for a family weekend getaway worth of luggage. Altogether, the updates do a good job of making the Jazz more desirable and building on the Jazz’s spacious, comfort-oriented appeal.

Honda Jazz Engine

The 2018 Honda Jazz does not get anything in the form of updates to the power-train and will be available with the standard 1.2-litre petrol engine that makes 89 horsepower, while the 1.5-litre diesel powertrain makes a conservative 99 horsepower. Honda has even glossed over the diesel CVT option like the Amaze gets, and the Petrol CVT replaces the top VX trim in terms of petrol meaning the petrol manual doesn’t get all the features that the top of line diesel or the Petrol CVT get. We had the 1.5-litre diesel i-DTEC engine on a test, and while it isn’t particularly slow, it’s not quick either. There is still a pronounced lag in the motor as the turbo spools around 1,600 rpm and the gearbox too makes you work a bit harder than expected.

This is a bit of a downer, especially considering how capable the chassis really is. Offsetting this a bit is the impressive fuel-efficiency since Honda claims exceptional mileage figures of 27 kmpl on the 2018 Honda Jazz, I-DTEC. Due to our short drive, we weren’t able to test the real-world fuel-efficiency but we’ll have those numbers soon after a detailed test. We really think a hotter version of the Jazz will be a more than welcome especially considering that Honda’s 1.5-litre VTEC motor from the City would be an absolute blast!

Honda Jazz Driving

The Jazz’ ride is the highlight of the package. There’s no change in suspension hardware, so it remains as comfy as ever. It manages to take the sting out of most patches of broken roads and potholes. On a calm city drive, it’s just what you want. The ride is relaxing as the suspension doesn’t let much into the cabin. As the speeds build, it remains poised even as the speedo hits triple digits. Push it past that, and you’d pick on a sense of floatiness. That said, as long as you stick to the speed limit, you should be plenty comfortable.

Since it’s tuned for outright comfort, there’s some predictable body roll as you enter a corner feistily. At no point does it feel nervous, though. What adds to the driver’s confidence is the ever so friendly Honda steering. Weight wise, it’s just right and it tells you what the front wheels are up to.

Honda Jazz Safety

Braking power on the hatchback is derived from front disc and rear drum brakes. As for safety, features such as dual front airbags, ABS with EBD, rear parking sensor, speed-sensing auto door lock and day/night inside rear view mirror are standard across line-up. Other features, including automatic climate control, steering-mounted audio controls, tilt adjust for the steering, and height-adjustable driver’s seat continue to be on offer. So, nothing drastically new here either.

Honda Jazz Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Jazz Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,51,665/- (Jazz V MT Petrol) to 9,30,434/- (Jazz VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Jazz from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Jazz price in Hyderabad at carzprice

Honda Jazz Conclusion

Honda has given its premium hatchback a feature update. There is no change in terms of design and engine set-up. With the new features on-board, the 2018 Honda Jazz is a bit pricier than its predecessor.Overall the 2018 Honda Jazz is still a spacious, convenient and comfortable hatch that offers some differences from the regular crop of premium hatchbacks that are on sale in India presently. This update just helps it add relevance and stay in the running, ahead of the all-new car likely to debut soon!

Honda Brio Facelift Review & First Drive

Honda Brio Overview

Honda’s first small car for the Indian market promises a lot and from our first impression it does have the capability to deliver on those promises. It is however nothing like the Honda new small car concept we saw unveiled at the 2010 Auto Expo in Delhi. That was a far more sportier looking hatchback though the Brio by itself is attractive enough to warrant a fair amount of attention. The styling is pretty close to the Jazz with the sharply raked hood tapering towards the grille though it’s much more compact. Yet the Brio has a wide footprint, 1.6 metres wide that makes it look well planted and stable. The roof gets taller as it flows towards the rear but the most eye-catching element is the hatch – made out of transparent glass. It’s a very attractive design element and quite practical too, at least it will prevent all those pesky hotel and mall security personnel from wanting to open your boot all the time. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

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Honda Brio Style

A nip and tuck for the Brio was long overdue, considering that it had been around for about half a decade. The little Honda was lauded for its city-friendly proportions and peppy motor, but sales did slump a fair bit purely because the opposition kicked things up a notch. For the first time in five years, the hatch has been given a facelift to take on the newer lot. But are the changes good enough?

Changes to the exterior are minimal. The Brio retains its cutesy face, but there’s an all-new bumper and grille combo. As you might have figured out already, it’s the same setup we’ve seen on the updated Amaze, just with the chrome grille being swapped for a gloss black one here. It looks more mature now, but on a personal front, I still prefer the older face. The side and rear get absolutely no updates whatsoever, save for a stubby spoiler with LED lights and updated detailing in the tail lamps. The all-glass hatch is unique to the Brio, but it is surprising to see Honda skimp out on a rear wiper. The flat-ish tail is likeable, but the design is beginning to show its age. On a related note, we’d have loved to see the hot RS version that other Asian markets get, with the super-cool projector headlamps and dual-tone alloy wheels, but sadly that isn’t an option just as yet.

Honda Brio Space

The interiors of the Brio are fairly up-market and contemporary – at least they feel richer than what Toyota has used inside the Etios/Liva. It also feels wider though three full grown adults at the back will be a tight fit. There is however enough knee room and space to place your feet comfortably, even for the guy squeezed in between the other two thanks to the nearly flat floor.

The dashboard is a pleasant mix of beige and chocolate brown, the clocks are sporty and the steering wheel complements the whole look. Our ‘one below the top of the line’ variant got steering mounted audio controls though the 2-DIN stereo does not accept compact discs and like the Jazz it only has aux and USB connectivity which may work for some but I’m not certain how many people will be comfortable making the technology shift in this segment.

The seats are comfortable though it takes time to find a position that fits you perfectly. One aspect that I found lacking was the number of storage options. In this department Honda broke new ground with the Jazz but that sort of immense and diverse storage options for any number and size of knicks knacks is not present in the Brio. You get the standard cup and bottle holders but thats that, nothing more special.

Honda Brio Engine

There are no changes to the powertrain, which means the Brio continues to be powered by the same 1.2-litre, four-cylinder motor. Power and torque figures remain unaltered at 88PS and 109Nm, and seem adequate.Much like before, the little i-VTEC pot begs to be revved hard. It’s the only way you can have a bit of fun with it. It sounds pleasing at high revs too, if I may add. The clutch – in true Honda fashion – is super light and has a small travel. It bites in nice and early, so setting off in start-stop traffic isn’t going to be a big hassle. But the torque kicks in slightly late, so you will find yourself downshifting often.

If you cannot be bothered with shifting gears yourself, there’s an automatic variant on offer as well. Unlike the rumours that suggested a possible CVT option the Brio continues to sport the good-old 5-speed torque converter automatic. There’s no perceptible difference in the way the hatch moves, so shifts are still smooth, and kickdown induces a lot of protest from the motor. Drive with a super light foot however, and the engine-gearbox combo feels at ease. Upshifts happen early in the rev range (~2000rpm) and the transmission tries to eke out every little bit of mileage it can from the motor. Claimed fuel-efficiency stands at 16.5kmpl versus 18.5kmpl for the manual. A set of paddle shifters would’ve sealed the deal, but then – that’s being a tad too greedy, isn’t it?

Honda Brio Driving

The Brio is a great city car, thanks to its compact dimensions, a fuel-efficient engine and a light steering. It does a nice job zipping about from point A to point B or just ambling about in the city with quiet restraint. But what happens when you show it a freshly-baked piece of tarmac with no sign of life around it? Well, we’re happy to inform you that this baby Honda keeps up with whatever you throw at it. Open the taps and the Brio reaches three-digit speeds in no time. Play with the revs and you’ll pass 150 kmph. While you are at those speeds, the Honda Brio doesn’t feel out of place. The steering has weighed up, the suspension is keeping the car in poise and there is not much jiggling about from this little performer.

Despite its compact dimensions, the Brio always feels as composed as some large sedans. The car feels tight and can stay like this for days, had it an everlasting fuel supply. NVH levels are well controlled too and little enters the cabin at higher speeds. The i-vtec motor is a smooth operator and goes about its business silently, until you press your right foot in disagreement. Being a light car with 88 PS power under the hood, the car zooms ahead with an effortless bellow, leaving behind most hatches in its wake. There is no hesitation from the motor, which, once past 3500 rpm, gives you the same doses of acceleration addiction as did the old Honda city with its 1.5 i-vtec heart. Like all Hondas, the Brio’s suspension is not suited for low speed use on rough roads. The springs crash and thrash about if you increase the violence and the Brio’s reassured ride stability is compromised. Thanks chiefly to a relatively harder suspension setup, the Brio handles corners with relative ease and composure, albeit with some amount of body roll.

Honda Brio Safety

For the safety of occupants, Brio gets a string of safety equipment including dual front airbags (available only on the high end trims), ABS and EBD, front seat belt pretensioner with load limiter, rear windshield defogger, driver seat belt reminder, day/night inside rear view mirror and immobilizer among a few others.Some of the key styling elements on the outside are new headlights, redesigned front chrome grille, mudguard in front and rear, front fog lamps and body coloured bumpers. Inside the cabin, Brio features chrome embellishment around air vent rings and gear shift ring while the steering wheel and inner door handles are finished in silver.

Honda Brio Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Brio Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 4,74,012/- (Brio E MT Petrol) to 6,86,685/- (Brio VX AT Petrol). Get best offers for Honda Brio from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Brio price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda Brio Conclusion

The Honda Brio is a brilliant small car that excels in most departments while keeping up with the rest of the competition in others. It is a great value proposition, providing comfort, space, fuel economy and performance, all at a justified price, keeping in mind that it wears the big H badge. However, we felt that the interiors could have been better and the suspension more passenger friendly. But this is just looking for needles in a hay stack, for the Brio is otherwise a brilliant all-round package. Also, do not forget that when one buys a car, one builds a relationship with not only the car but also the manufacturer.

Honda Amaze Performance & First Drive

Honda Amaze Overview

This is the all-new Honda Amaze. Everything from the chassis to the body shell, the interior design, the features, safety equipment and, very importantly, the transmission has been changed. The engines are not all-new but get improvements of their own for improved driveability, fuel efficiency and comfort. Honda says the goal for their R&D Asia Pacific department was to make a ‘one-class-above’ sub-4 metre sedan based on the feedback from both existing owners of the previous-gen sedan as well as potential customers of the all-new one. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

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Honda Amaze Style

Honda Amaze now comes in a completely new avatar. It is very different from the outgoing model. The car is underpinned by an all-new platform and the exteriors look appealing. It is now more stylish, and premium looking. The platform has made it longer, wider and the wheelbase has also increased.

Front

It gets the signature thick chrome grille of Honda and the front is flat in design. The grille blends into the headlamps, which are now much sleeker. The headlamps are regular halogen ones and are not projectors, even on the top end VX trim. The car gets LED daytime runnings lights integrated into the headlamp and the turn indicators are also embedded. The fog lamps are round in shape and have a black bezel. The bonnet has grooves which make it look muscular.

Side

The side of the 2018 Honda Amaze looks much more evolved now, especially with the well integrated boot. It looks more like a premium sedan from the side now. The door pillars are blacked out and it also has new door handles which are identical to the City. There is a shark fin antenna as well. The car gets 15-inch ally wheels on the top two V and VX variants. The base E and S variants get 14-inch steel wheels. The spare wheel is a 14-inch steel wheel, across all variants.

Rear

The rear of The new Amaze looks sportier. While the car we has earlier seen at the Auto Expo has a chrome strip on the boot, the production model does not get any chrome at the rear. The tail lamps are attractive and are of a split design. The rear bumper is large and extends low with an integrated skirt.

Honda Amaze Space

The second generation Amaze gets a completely new dashboard. Everything inside is new, starting from the 3-spoke multi-function steering wheel, instrument cluster with MID display, automatic climate control buttons, design on the AC vents and a DIGIPAD 2.0 touchscreen infotainment system. The materials used inside the cabin too feel more premium. Needless to say, the dual-tone black and beige treatment on the dashboard makes the cabin feel airy and large. The steering feels good to hold and in terms of features, the new Amaze offers Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, MirrorLink, cruise control, steering-mounted audio and cruise controls, push-button start, rear parking camera with sensors and electrically adjustable and foldable ORVMs.

The front seats provide great comfort and support, the side bolstering deserves a special mention. Cabin space is much improved in terms of headroom, shoulder room, legroom and knee clearance. The rear seat is a much more comfortable place to be in. However, under-thigh support is strictly average for both the front and rear seats. Ingress and egress are comfortable too. The almost flat floor at the rear seat also makes the new Amaze a comfortable 5-seater compact sedan. The AC is pretty impressive and cools the cabin quickly. Honda has increased the capacity of the compressor to ensure quick cooling in our country’s tropical climate. Boot space is up by 20-litres and now measures 420-litres, which is best-in-class.

Honda Amaze Gearbox

The same engines do duty in the 2018 Honda Amaze. One is the 1.2 litre, four cylinder, SOHC engine that produces 89bhp of power at 6000rpm and 110Nm of torque at 4500 rpm. The power and torque are slightly improved now. This engine comes with a 5-speed manual transmission and also a CVT. The engine feels smooth and refined. The manual one, though not outrightly punchy, suits easy driving. The gearshifts are fine and the clutch is light. The CVT transmission focusses more on comfort and is laid back in acceleration. It takes it own sweet time and can get boring as well.The second engine is the 1.5-litre diesel engine with 99bhp of power at 3600rpm and 200Nm of torque at 1750rpm. The engine is now tweaked to offer better performance and fuel efficiency. It comes mated five-speed manual transmission. The manual diesel is the most fun to drive of the lot. There is good grint in the engine and has sprightly performance. I was quite suprised at the way the NVH levels are controlled now. There is considerably less noise intruding inside the cabin now. Not that its not noisy, but much better than before.

The highlight here is the new diesel CVT which is seen for the first time. I wasn’t so convinced about it, until I drove it. It feels good to drive. Of course, it again focuses on comfort rather than outright performance, but it is not disappointing either. The acceleration is smooth as the speed builds up in a linear fashion. Now this engine has a reduced power of 80 bhp, which is 20bhp less than the manual version and the torque is also 160Nm. The reduction of power and torque is due to the fact that diesel engine has a flatter torque available across a range of rpms, hence unlike petrol, the diesel CVT does not require high power. However, the drive experience of this one was quite impressive and we do recommend it if you prefer long leisure driving.

Though we did not do a detailed mileage test, however, we estimate a city mileage of around 12 km/l and highway mileage of 16km/l for the petrol manual. The petrol CVT will return around 10km/l in the city and around 15 km/l on the highway.The diesel manual is the most fuel efficient one with a city mileage of around 15 km/l and on the highway it will return close to 19-20km/l. The diesel CVT will return 12-13km/l in the city and around 17-18km/l on the highway.

Honda Amaze Driving

The new Amaze is a big improvement in this department. The new chassis is lighter and so the car is more chuckable. It handles better than the earlier model and the steering response is also better. High speed stability is good and it gives more confidence during cornering. The brakes are fine, but I would have preferred some more bite, specially at high speeds. What impressed us most is the rear seat ride quality. The new suspension has revised damping and the feel is close to a European car. The car also doesn’t get unsettled easily o bad patches. The glove box of the car kept popping open whenever we ran over a speed breaker. A lock adjustment would solve that issue.

Honda Amaze Safety

In terms of safety features, the 2018 Honda Amaze continues to get dual airbags and ABS with EBD but now as standard across the range. The Japanese automaker’s after-sales service has been great and the network is wide-spread too.

Honda Amaze Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Amaze Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 5,62,455/- (Amaze E MT Petrol) to 8,99,900/- ( Amaze V CVT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Amaze from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Amaze price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda Amaze Conclusion

The exterior design may not appeal to everyone, the interior design, space and equipment on offer certainly will. Couple all this with one of the best ride-and-handling packages on any car in the sub-4 metre sedan segment, the Honda Amaze should feature on top of your list if you are looking to buy one in the near future.

“The 2018 Amaze feels like an all-rounder and, at least with its diesel MT/CVT variants, makes a good case for itself “

Honda City Engine & Gearbox

Honda City Overview

The Honda City is the main reason behind Honda’s premium image in India. It has been the reigning dominator of the sedan segment and features in every car manufacturer’s rival list in India.Modern and contemporary design with premium interiors makes the City a near to perfect premium sedan. The quality of finishing in this sedan is the best offered among its competition.Battling a tough fight against all the diesel options offered by its rivals, Honda City still manages to command its strong position. However, with so many options being available in the market, will the Honda City hold on to its charm is what we find out in our review. . Honda City price range in India is between 8,73,301/- to 14,01,886/-, check for detail pricing of City in Carzprice

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Honda City Design

The Honda City has always had the design which looks ahead of its time. Except for the dolphin model, every generation of the City has impressed everyone with its futuristic design appeal.Sleek tail lamps along with the long stretched radiator grille make the front design of the Honda City very sporty. The radiator grille has been generously treated with chrome but very tastefully and does not look tacky at all. The front bonnet flows towards the nose of the front fascia. On the front bumpers is the contrast black air intake vent which gels well with the overall design.

The City is based on the Arrow shot form design which is seen on the raised shoulder line from the headlights to the rear profile. In the mid life facelift the ground clearance of the City has been improved and is now at 165mm which is a welcome change over the earlier offering as the lower section used to get scraped while crossing speed breakers especially when the car was filled with occupants.

The 10 spoke alloy wheel look very sporty and so does the slender roofline. The smart and crisp design of the City make it look very athletic compared to its competition.On the rear profile, the rear boot lip gets all the major attention as it is short and sporty. The tail lamp design is smart and the line descends from the boot through the rail lamp to the lower half of the rear profile which make it look very dynamic.Honda City looks right when seen from any angle as it does not have any artificial lines which flow out of proportion but instead a smart profile throughout the exterior profile of the car.

Honda City Cabin

This has to be the best cabin of any D segment sedan available in India. Its ultra premium feel and sophisticated treatment combined with the supreme finish of trims makes the interiors of Honda City a great space to be in.On the instrumental panel is soft blue lit display with three rings in an aluminum finish which show the speedometer, tachometer and the fuel left. It is a very clean arrangement. There 3 spoke steering wheel offers a very precise grip, it also has steering mounted controls for audio as well as cruise control settings.

The central panel has been done very neatly with the correct colour combinations of light beige teamed with dark plastics. The plastic quality is fantastic and so it the materials used in the door trims.Seating inside the Honda City is very comfortable as it has been cushioned really well. Even for taller passengers there is no discomfort of any sort. The legroom and the headroom offered for the front row of passengers is superb while for the rear row of passengers the same is decent.

Among the storage options, it has a decently spacious glove box. Also under the armrest of the driver, there is a small storage box. There is a small pocket of the front door trims which can hold few tickets and miscellaneous paper bits. The boot space in the Honda City is very generous too.Overall the interiors of the Honda City are simply close to perfect and leave no reason to complain. The smart use of chrome inside, materials used in fabric and everything inside the cabin of the City makes you rave about it.

Honda City Performance

The City continues to be powered by the same set of petrol and diesel engines. The 1.5 litre i-DTEC engine that makes 100hp and 200Nm delivers great low-end performance and is smooth and linear in a very un-diesel-like way, but rev it hard and it becomes rather noisy. Honda claims to have added more insulation for lowering the NVH levels in the diesel, and, though it is a marked improvement, there’s only so much that could be done to curb what is inherently a noisy engine. Ambient sounds have gone down a bit, but the diesel engine rattle is still an issue.The petrol option is of course the tried and tested naturally-aspirated 1.5 i-VTEC engine developing 119hp and 145Nm. The motor is still a riot for enthusiasts, revving out eagerly to its red line and making a lot of its power at the top end. It’s quite usable at the bottom end too and, as the revs climb, it can get a bit vocal.

Gearbox options remain the same as well with a six-speed manual for the diesel and a choice between five-speed manual or seven-step CVT automatic for the petrol. With India’s crowded roads and newfound fondness for automatics, it’s sad that the City doesn’t offer such an option on the diesel, but that’s just something that will perhaps have to wait for the next generation.With no mechanical changes to the suspension either, the ride remains largely the same, which is to say agreeable by class standards, but not the class best. There’s still a fair bit of roll around corners and the ride quality can get a bit choppy at times. The top ZX variants do get new 16-inch alloys and wider tyres, and thankfully they don’t seem to have hurt the ride quality at all. As for the handling, we didn’t get much of a chance to test it on Delhi’s wide, smooth and straight roads, so the verdict is still out on that one.

Honda City Driving

The mechanicals of the updated Honda City remain same. Doing duty at the front are the MacPherson struts while the rear makes use of an H-shaped torsion beam. The 2008 new-shapeCity was criticised for its unsettling ride quality which was improved considerably in the fourth-gen model. The suspension set-up absorbs the uneven undulations with great ease. The other bit that impressed me about the City arethe lower NVH levels which do not let ambient noise seep inside the cabin. The overall dynamics of the sedan remains identical to the previous offering.

Honda City Safety

Honda has upped their game in terms of safety for the new City. The car now comes with dual front airbags, ABS, EBD and ISOFIX seats as standard across all the trims. On the range topping ZX trim you now get six airbags! Honda’s after sales is well known in India and the H badge is known for its reliability. The Japanese automaker has expanded its network from 295 dealers to 332 in this fiscal year. The City is heavily localised and the cost of maintenance is easy on the pocket. It even offers good resale value.

Honda City Cost

Honda City Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 8,73,301/- (City S MT Petrol) to 14,01,886/- (City Zx MT Diesel Anniversary Edition). Get best offers for Honda City from Honda Dealers in India

Honda City Bottomline

Offcourse the facelift city no doubt will help carry forward the legacy of the City sedan ahead. This has been one of the most popular C-segment sedans of the country and actually has helped Honda to cement their position in the Indian market. The facelift sedan might not bring a lot of change with it but it definitely will help bring some fresh appeal with it until and unless the new generation sedan is launched in the Indian market.