What Are The Results Of Your Child’s Evaluation

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Once your child goes through the evaluation process, you’ll get a report that explains what the testing showed. There are a number of terms used to report on test results and how tests are scored. Being familiar with these terms can help you better understand what the results mean.

The Importance of Statistics

Statistics is the science of using math to make sense of and interpret large amounts of information. Statistics help evaluators:

A. Organize and present data in ways that are easier to understand. The information can be used to make graphs and charts that show patterns.

B. Describe data in ways that help you see how your child fits into a larger group of people.

C. Draw conclusions from data to get an idea of how best to support your child.

Testing Terms to Know

A number of different terms are used to talk about test results. Knowing what these terms mean is a good start to understanding what your child needs. For Educational Evaluations in US visit UT Evaluators 

1. Norm-referenced:

A norm-referenced test compares your child’s scores to the scores of other kids the same age. The “norm group” is a large, random group of kids who have taken the same test.

Their scores are used to determine what’s typical for the age group. For example, on one test, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), the average score is 100.

2. Test reliability:

A reliable test is one that would provide the same results every time. That means if your child took the test a few times, the scores would be roughly the same. Longer tests tend to be more reliable than short ones.

For example, the score on a test with fewer questions is more likely to be affected by your child not paying attention to one of the questions. That’s because each question is worth more on a shorter test.

If your child missed one answer on a spelling test of five words, his grade would be 80 percent. If he missed one word out of twenty, his grade would be 95 percent.

3. Standard score:

Most educational tests have standard scores based on a scale that makes the average score 100. But the average always falls within a range. There’s wiggle room (sometimes referred to as “standard error”) in test scores to account for possible mistakes.

So, an average score is actually a range of numbers. For example, if an average score is 100 and the standard error is 15, that means the average is really anywhere between 85 and 115.

4. Standard deviation (SD):

The standard deviation is the average distance (or number of points) between all test scores and the average score. For example, the WISC has an SD of 15 points. Most kids fall between the range of 85–115 points.

One SD (15 points) from the average or standard score (100 in this case) isn’t statistically significant. “Statistically significant” means that the difference isn’t due to chance or error.

So what does this mean? If your child’s score is only one SD lower than the average, the score is still considered average. However, if your child’s score is two standard deviations (30 points) above or below the average, that’s significant.

Keep in mind that 68 percent of the population falls into the average score range between 85 and 115. Anywhere in that range is considered average, although you may see it described as “high average” or “low average.”

5. Percentile:

The percentile shows the proportion of scores that were lower than your child’s score. Imagine your child is one of 100 kids being tested. If your child is at the 75th percentile, it means he scored higher than 75 of the 100 kids tested.

Subtest Scores

Many tests are made up of a number of short tests that look at different skills. Those short tests are called subtests. An achievement test may have subtests for vocabulary, working memory and visual reasoning. Each subtest has its own score.

Sometimes the scores of subtests that look at different pieces of bigger skills are combined. For example, a vocabulary subtest and a language comprehension subtest might be combined to give a “verbal ability” score.

Subtest scores are important. When there’s a big difference in the scores of different skill groups, it can show the specific area in which your child is having difficulty. Check for Educational Evaluations in US here

An Example of an Evaluation Result

The evaluation report will usually have a chart that shows the different types of scores. It will also include information about the reliability of the test and the standard deviations. But it may also have a written interpretation of the results.

For example: Jane obtained a standard score of 85 (-1 SD) on the WISC, which is ranked at the 16th percentile and is classified as low average. This means Jane’s score was below the average score of 100. She scored the same or higher than 16 percent of kids her age in the general population. While her score is still considered to be average, it’s at the low end of the average range.

Putting It All Together

Scores alone don’t tell you what’s going to help your child. The summary and recommendations are where all the information comes together and the evaluator tells you what it means.

The summary and recommendations section helps answer these questions:

A. What does this mean for your child’s ability to learn?

B. Do these results show that your child has learning issues that require special education services?

C. What types of services, ways of teaching, assistive technology and other support could benefit your child? If your child is eligible for special education services, the Individual Education Program (IEP) team will consider the answers to these questions.

D. The more you understand the meaning of scores from educational or psychological evaluations, the better able you are to be an active team participant.

5 Benefits Of Inclusion Classrooms

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Many schools have inclusion classrooms. In part, that’s because the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) says that kids who receive special education services should learn in what’s called the “least restrictive environment” (LRE). That means they should spend as much time as possible with students who don’t receive special education services.

Inclusive classes are set up in a number of ways. Some use a collaborative team teaching (or co-teaching) model. With co-teaching, there’s a special education teacher in the room all day.

Other inclusive classes have special education teachers “push in” at specific times during the day to teach (instead of pulling kids out of class to a separate room). In either case, both teachers are available to help all students. Check for Educational Evaluations in US at UT Evaluators

Studies show that inclusion is beneficial for all students—not just those who receive special education services.

Benefit #1: Differentiated Instruction

All students learn differently. This is a principal of inclusive education. One key teaching strategy is to break students into small groups. By using small groups, teaching can be tailored to the way each student learns best. This is known as differentiated instruction.

Teachers meet everyone’s needs by presenting lessons in different ways and using Universal Design for Learning (UDL). For example, they may use multisensory instruction. In math, that may mean using visual aids and manipulatives like cubes or colored chips to help kids learn new concepts. (See more examples of multisensory math techniques.)

Some classrooms may have an interactive whiteboard. On it, kids can use their fingers to write, erase and move images around on the large screen. This teaching tool can also be used to turn students’ work into a video, which can be exciting for kids and help keep them engaged.

Benefit #2: Supportive Teaching Strategies

In an inclusive classroom, teachers weave in specially designed instruction and support that can help students make progress. Kids may be given opportunities to move around or use fidgets. And teachers often put positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) in place.

These strategies are helpful for all students—not only for students with learning and attention issues.

Benefit #3: Reduced Stigma

Inclusive classrooms are filled with diverse learners. That lets kids talk about how everyone learns in their own way. They may find that they have more in common with other kids than they thought. This can go a long way in reducing stigma for kids with learning and attention issues. It can also help kids build and maintain friendships.

Benefit #4: Effective Use of Resources

In more traditional special education settings, many kids are “pulled out” for related services, like speech therapy or for other specialized instruction. An inclusion class often brings speech therapists, reading specialists and other service providers into the classroom. For Educational Evaluations in US visit here

These professionals can provide information and suggestions to help all students. If your child isn’t eligible for special education, but still needs some extra support, it can provide him with some informal support.

Benefit #5: High Expectations for All

If your child has an Individualized Education Program (IEP), his goals should be based on the academic standards for your state. Those standards lay out what all students are expected to learn in math, reading, science and other subjects by the end of the school year.

Differentiated instruction and co-teaching in a general education classroom make it easier for students with standards-based IEPs to be taught the same material as their classmates.

In some schools, only certain classrooms are inclusion classes. In that case, schools may assign general education students randomly to inclusive or non-inclusive classes. Other schools may choose students who benefit from the emphasis on meeting the needs of all learners at all ability levels.

Talk to your child’s school about the supports and services that might be available in an inclusion classroom. Learn more about teaching strategies that work well for students with learning and attention issues. And read about the various models of collaborative team teaching.

U.S. Department of Education offers a new tool to help schools measure ed tech results

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A new tool from the U.S. Department of Education will help school districts rapidly measure the results of education technology.The Ed Tech Rapid Cycle Evaluation Coach was announced last week at the Blended and Online Learning Symposium in San Antonio, Texas. It’s still in the early stages, so those interested in using the tool must apply to be part of the inaugural group.

Technology vendors tend to make grandiose claims about the usefulness of their programs. But there’s precious little research, aside from marketing materials and vendors’ “studies” of their own programs. Independent, high-quality methods commonly used to study educational programs tend to move slowly. In technology that can be a problem, because technology changes so rapidly – by the time the study is complete the program has likely reinvented itself. Check for Educational Evaluations in US at UT Evaluators

Teachers and schools aren’t waiting for gold-standard research before they begin test-driving new tools in the classroom. As a result, teachers find themselves using programs and products without any clear method for evaluating whether or not they will work.

“Districts and states are spending millions of dollars buying educational apps [technology applications, tools and platforms], many of which have minimal evidence supporting their effectiveness,” Katrina Stevens, deputy director of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Technology, wrote last week. “Additionally, once a purchase is made, there is often no systematic process for reviewing the effectiveness of ed tech tools before renewing contracts, which collectively can run into the millions of dollars.”

The Department’s new program will guide school leaders and teachers through the steps they should take before buying education technology. The “RCE Coach” will help schools define goals, create effective pilot programs, gather evidence and measure results. The research tool is being created with help from SRI International and Mathematica, two well-known (and highly regarded) research groups. The tool will not provide the same results as working closely with a traditional researcher, but it will allow schools to measure if technology is helping them meet whatever goal school leaders have set for themselves.

It will be available to schools in January. In the meantime, the department of education needs help from district- and school-level administrators who are willing to try the program. They are accepting applications from schools. It’s free. Educational Evaluations in US visit here

“The goal is to fundamentally change the procurement and implementation process to include a continuous cycle of evidence-based decision making and to help states and districts spend millions of dollars more effectively,” Stevens wrote.

What Is The Concept Of Evaluation

In every walk of life the process of evaluation takes place in one or the other form. If the evaluation process is eliminated from human life then perhaps the aim of life may be lost. It is only through evaluation that one can discriminate between good and bad. The whole cycle of social development revolves around the evaluation process.

In education how much a child has succeeded in his aims, can only be determined through evaluation. Thus there is a close relationship between evaluation and aims.Education is considered as an investment in human beings in terms of development of human resources, skills, motivation, knowledge and the like. Evaluation helps to build an educational programme, assess its achievements and improve upon its effectiveness. Check for Educational Evaluations in US at UT Evaluators

It serves as an in-built monitor within the programme to review the progress in learning from time to time. It also provides valuable feedback on the design and the implementation of the programme. Thus, evaluation plays a significant role in any educational programme.Evaluation plays an enormous role in the teaching-learning process. It helps teachers and learners to improve teaching and learning. Evaluation is a continuous process and a periodic exercise.

It helps in forming the values of judgement, educational status, or achievement of student. Evaluation in one form or the other is inevitable in teaching-learning, as in all fields of activity of education judgements need to be made.In learning, it contributes to formulation of objectives, designing of learning experiences and assessment of learner performance. Besides this, it is very useful to bring improvement in teaching and curriculum. It provides accountability to the society, parents, and to the education system.

Let us discuss its uses briefly:

(i) Teaching:

Evaluation is concerned with assessing the effectiveness of teaching, teaching strategies, methods and techniques. It provides feedback to the teachers about their teaching and the learners about their learning.

(ii) Curriculum:

The improvement in courses/curricula, texts and teaching materials is brought about with the help of evaluation.

(iii) Society:

Evaluation provides accountability to society in terms of the demands and requirements of the employment market.

(iv) Parents:

Evaluation mainly manifests itself in a perceived need for regular reporting to parents.In brief, evaluation is a very important requirement for the education system. It fulfills various purposes in systems of education like quality control in education, selection/entrance to a higher grade or tertiary level. For Educational Evaluations in US visit here

It also helps one to take decisions about success in specific future activities and provides guidance to further studies and occupation. Some of the educationists view evaluation virtually synonymous with that of learner appraisal, but evaluation has an expanded role.It plays an effective role in questioning or challenging the objectives.

What Is The Evaluation for The Operational Objectives Of Educational Evaluation

It is possible to identify some “operational objectives” or uses of educational evaluation, in addition to the general aims of educational evaluation. Check for Educational Evaluations in US at UT Evaluators

The following objectives are linked to the implementation and practice of educational evaluation and, to the uses of its outcomes at different moments of the process. The following list is certainly not exhaustive. Educational evaluation has a lot of potential and uses, but among others, the following:

1  To plan better

Educational evaluation can help to change things and to plan “different things”, but it can also help us to plan things better, in order to prevent negative consequences and to compensate for possible shortcomings.

2  To take stock of achievements

It is important to recognise, name and give value to the achievements of the educational process so that they do not get lost or not sufficiently used.

3  To consolidate results

Identified results can be consolidated by making them explicit at the end of the evaluation process. The description, sharing and further use of results are natural follow-up steps of educational evaluation.

4  To check if we met the interests of the funding institutions

When funding institutions support a certain educational project, they do it according to certain criteria: the nature of the project, its objectives, their priorities. Funding institutions usually ask to receive a descriptive and evaluative report at the end of the project. Even so, educational evaluation plans and criteria should not be limited to the expectations of the organisations that fund the project. But, it is important to consider and include them. Usually this is not a difficult exercise: in most cases the questions they would like to answer through evaluation would be part of our evaluation anyway. For Educational Evaluations in US visit here

5  To reinforce co-operation with partners

If partners are involved in the educational project, they will be involved in its evaluation. A constructive and participative evaluation will naturally reinforce co-operation.But, even if your partners are not directly involved, the results of the evaluation can be ofinterest to them. You might share new ideas for common projects, other fields of common interest and ways of co-operating, new partners and networks with them.