Honda BR V Performance & First Drive

Honda BR V Overview

The BR-V is Honda’s new small SUV for India. It’s an all-new model but comes built on the same platform as the Honda Brio, Amaze and Mobilio models. In case you are wondering, BR-V expands to ‘Bold Runabout Vehicle’ and Honda has no pretensions in admitting this is a car meant for an urban clientele. Those looking for something with mud-plugging ability had better look elsewhere. Not to say the BR-V is an exception. Rather, it fits right into a market segment where off-road prowess is rarely ever a consideration for buyers. You are probably already familiar with the Hyundai Creta, Maruti S-cross, Renault Duster and Nissan Terrano that the BR-V will take on, so let’s get straight to it and see where and how the Honda hopes to differentiate itself.

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The first thing of note is its length. With a length of 4,456mm, the BR-V is the longest of the small SUVs and by quite a margin. For perspective, a Hyundai Creta measures 4,270mm from end-to-end. Second, the BR-V is not immediately identifiable as a Brio, Amaze and Mobilio platform mate, at least when viewed from the front, and that’s a good thing. The BR-V’s squared-out bonnet, angular headlamps and chrome-rich two-part grille has given it a bespoke face and it looks all the better for it. However, see it in profile and you could mistake it for a Mobilio; the upward shoulder line and distinctive kinked window line are shared with the MPV. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop.

Honda BR V Style

Does it look like a Mobilio on steroids? Umm, not entirely. The face and the rear look nothing like the Mobilio. However, the side profile, especially that kink in the window line, makes it look awfully similar.The Honda BRV shares its platform with the Amaze compact sedan and the Mobilio MPV. We’re glad it shares just the platform and not the looks. The face looks inspired from the new Accord, incorporating neat elements, such as projector headlamps with LED light guides and a thick double slat chrome grille. We like the finer aspects such as the detailing in the headlamps, the aggressive creases on the bumper and the silver skid plate. All these work well together to give the BR-V a likeable front profile.

The side and the rear are slightly bland in comparison. The 16-inch alloy wheels look great in isolation. However, pair them with the sheer length of the BR-V and it tends to look lost and rather small. We think a set of 17-inch alloys, like the Creta, would’ve filled in the wheel arches beautifully and given the BR-V a more balanced side profile. It gets a healthy dose of creases here as well and does remind one of the Mobilio.The matte-black cladding, flared wheel arches and the roof rails grab a lot of attention. They do their bit to lend the BR-V the rugged appeal that its potential customers want. I for one, love the connected tail-lamps. Look closely and you will find LED light guides in them too.

Honda has played the length card with the BR-V. It is by far the longest vehicle in its class. However, it isn’t as wide. The Honda is 45mm narrower compared to the Creta, and a full 87mm narrower compared to the Duster. While this was a boon in certain narrow bylanes of Udaipur, we wish the car was slightly wider. The added width would have not only liberated more space inside but also contributed to giving it a butch stance. To sum up, the ‘van meets SUV’ design is a mixed bag. It looks great from certain angles, such as the front three-quarters, but ends up looking drab and mini-van like from the rear. Honda has somehow managed to stitch it all together into one neat package.

Honda BR V Space

This is the area where BRV truly scores big. A large cabin with a very good all round visibility makes it a nice place to be in. Our test car was an older version and hence lacked a touch screen with reverse parking sensor making it difficult to slot it in tight parking places while reversing. Even the Bluetooth pairing was a bit cumbersome when compared to similar feature in other modern cars, but thankfully Honda has addressed both these issues in the newer versions.

The highlight of the car is the space available for the fellow passengers, be it the second row seat with features like front & back seat slider and backrest recline adjustments, or the third row seat which can actually accommodate full size adults, unlike the other seven seaters available in the market. For the comfort of the third row passenger, Honda has also provided the seat recline feature here and small storage spaces are provided for improved convenience on long hauls.

The single touch tumble feature for the second row seats, ensure easy access to the last row seats. Also, the split seat folding for both rows provide the user with multiple options for storing tricky luggage in the car. This is particularly useful when you don’t trust a courier guy on safe transit of fragile lightweight stuff, over short distances e.g., delicate and voluminous articles like large canvas paintings, glass artefacts or any other simple household item needing careful handling. Check for Honda BR V  in industrynewswire.in

Honda BR V Gearbox

As expected, the BR-V for India will be available with three powertrain options with power channelled solely to the front wheels. There will not be any all-wheel-drive version. The mainstay of the BR-V range will be the diesel model that comes powered by Honda’s 1.5-litre, i-DTEC engine. While there were indications the engine would be tuned for more power on the BR-V, it continues to make 100hp and 200Nm; same as on the Honda City, Jazz and Mobilio. However, refinement sees an improvement. The engine runs a lot quieter than it does on the other Hondas and the note is also less industrial. That said, the diesel BR-V is still noisier than the Creta and even the Renault Duster.

Performance from the diesel engine is good with plenty of pulling power from very low in the rev band. Where the engine does feel slightly different now, is in its willingness to rev more freely. The engine still doesn’t excite, but there’s more of a powerband to play with. Another nice feature is the smooth-shifting six-speed gearbox that’s allied to a light clutch, both of which help make the BR-V diesel an easy car to drive in town. Diesel BR-V buyers can also expect good fuel economy. The ARAI-tested fuel efficiency figure of 21.9kpl makes this version of the BR-V the most fuel-efficient model among the small SUVs. Before you ask, no, there will not be an automatic version for the diesel.

The other engine of choice will be Honda’s 119hp, 1.5-litre, i-VTEC petrol engine. This engine will be available with both manual and automatic gearbox options. Interestingly, the manual gearbox is a new six-speed unit rather than the five-speed one the petrol City and Mobilio come with. Honda insiders haven’t confirmed if this gearbox will make it to the other Hondas as well, but it’s something to expect in the near future. The petrol manual BR-V’s ARAI-tested fuel efficiency is 15.4kpl while the petrol automatic’s figure is slightly higher at 16kpl. The BR-V automatic that is likely to interest urban buyers uses a continuously variable transmission (CVT). Drivers have the option to manually operate the gearbox via steering-mounted paddles which is a first-in-class feature.

The CVT-equipped BR-V does feel nice and responsive for city use. Initial responses are good and pottering around town is a smooth and relaxed affair. But press down hard on the accelerator and you get that rubber-band effect CVTs are notorious for. The gearbox has the engine hold revs until speeds build and this also brings out the engine’s noisiest side. The otherwise smooth engine sounds gruff when this happens, and seems especially thrashy close to the 6,500rpm. Drive with moderate throttle inputs and you’ll like the CVT a lot more. Enthusiasts will like the option of the paddle shifters that work without any delay and let you shuffle between the gearbox’s seven ‘steps’. However, due to the characteristics of the CVT setup, you don’t get the same sort of connect you would with a traditional automatic or dual-clutch transmission.

Honda BR V Driving

The BR-V’s ride is forgiving and absorbs most of the undulations our roads will ever throw at it. It is stiffly sprung, but not up to the point where the ride becomes jarring. At low speeds, the 210mm of ground clearance and the India-friendly suspension dismiss the potholes and broken roads without a hiccup. The ride is slightly bouncy at the second and third row but is tolerable for shorter journeys.

Handling has been the Japanese carmaker’s forte for long. The steering weight and feel are just about right. It is wonderfully light at low speeds letting you chuck the thing around with a finger. However, the turning radius is gigantic thanks to the length. Taking a U-turn is a task in itself. Other than that, the BR-V is sure-footed and doesn’t mind being thrown around a series of bends. There’s enough feedback that gives you the confidence to push it through the corners as well.

Honda BR V Safety

The braking system of Honda BR-V features disc brakes at the front and drum brakes at the rear. The ABS with EBD is used as a standard in all variants except the petrol E variant.The body shell is made strong with ACE body structure and front dual airbags are introduced in all variants for complete safety of the occupants.Braking duties are taken care of by disc brakes at the front, and drums at the rear. Braking power is adequate and the SUV doesn’t nose dive a lot under heavy braking and manages to maintain its line as well. Safety is taken care of by dual airbags that are standard across the range.

Honda BR V Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Brv On-Road Price in Hyderabad ranges from 10,46,963 to 15,65,132 for variants BRV E Petrol and BRV VX Diesel respectively. Honda Brv is available in 9 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Honda Brv variants price in Hyderabad. Check for BR V price in Hyderabad at Carzprice.

Honda BR V Conclusion

In the last three months Honda BRV travelled with us for a total distance of over 5000 kms. During this period we did not come across any technical glitch barring a minor failure of internal air circulation switch, which got rectified promptly by the local dealership. The BR-V worked with us like a loyal horse without the regular whine and complaints. It returned a very good city mileage and could carry seven occupants with ease offering reasonable comfort even for the third row passenger. Overall we found Honda BR-V to be a sensible and trouble free buy for someone looking for a large family car offering comfort, reliability and a bit of status for the owner. While its not exactly ideal for long distance travel, it fit in well for daily usage and also your weekend getaways.

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